Flawed?

Flawed? explores the stigma and negative reactions associated with skin conditions in Africa.It was inspired by the people I know with vitiligo and albinism. The poem also expresses that beauty is beyond skin deep and loving ones uniqueness in itself makes one beautiful.

Flawed?

They Mock You

This is a poem about how girls shrivel to fit society's expectations. Growing up in Northern Nigeria, I see girls mocked by men about almost everything; the way she thinks, the way she walks, her abilities, her fears… forgetting that she is the product of certain peculiarities of that society and she is capable of so much more outside of it.

They Mock You

Dear Internal Runes

I am a third generation Zulu young lady. I was raised in a community that is deeply rooted in tradition which has grown to be culture. I exist in stories in my skin, shade and shape. I write letters about the experiences of inheriting the growing pains of my parents and community. My desire is to capture the essence of the beauty and challenges of growing up brown skinned.

Dear Internal Runes

Mother's Inheritance

With these poems, I want to let younger African women know that they do not have to suffer like their mothers and grandmothers did and that they have the right to demand better for themselves, and they have the right to go out there and do better for themselves.

Mother's Inheritance

Mama Africa in Two Minds

Through my poems, I hope to embody two messages: firstly, that women are potent in their dual identity that honors traditional stereotypes while embracing modern-day opportunities, and secondly, that Africa will come into its own – an ode to its self-imposed rebirth. 

Mama Africa in Two Minds

Black is not “Just”

I wrote this poem to try and find other ways to envision blackness besides the stereotypical characterization many define the skin by. I remember the day I binge-watched Spike Lee’s “She’s gotta have it”… It opened my eyes to the many ways I can use my poetry and art to unapologetically speak out and inspire others and redefine experiences.

Black is not “Just”